There have been a two long threads on the debian-devel mailing list about the representation of the changes to upstream source code made by Debian maintainers. Here are a few notes for my own reference.

I spent a lot of time defending the workflow I described in dgit-maint-merge(7) (which was inspired by this blog post). However, I came to be convinced that there is a case for a manually curated series of patches for certain classes of package. It will depend on how upstream uses git (rebasing or merging) and on whether the Debian delta from upstream is significant and/or long-standing. I still think that we should be using dgit-maint-merge(7) for leaf or near-leaf packages, because it saves so much volunteer time that can be better spent on other things.

When upstream does use a merging workflow, one advantage of the dgit-maint-merge(7) workflow is that Debian’s packaging is just another branch of development.

Now consider packages where we do want a manually curated patch series. It is very hard to represent such a series in git. The only natural way to do it is to continually rebase the patch series against an upstream branch, but public branches that get rebased are not a good idea. The solution that many people have adopted is to represent their patch series as a folder full of .diff files, and then use gbp pq to convert this into a rebasing branch. This branch is not shared. It is edited, rebased, and then converted back to the folder of .diff files, the changes to which are then committed to git.

One of the advantages of dgit is that there now exists an official, non-rebasing git history of uploads to the archive. It would be nice if we could represent curated patch series as branches in the dgit repos, rather than as folders full of .diff files. But as I just described, this is very hard. However, Ian Jackson has the beginnings of a workflow that just might fit the bill.

Now consider packages where we do want a manually curated patch series. It is very hard to represent such a series in git.

I built a tool for that. Currently working on making it more native to git.

Comment by josh Tue 10 Jan 2017 10:51:05 UTC
I’ve been meaning to try out git-series at some point. Thanks for reminding me!
Comment by spwhitton Wed 11 Jan 2017 00:09:51 UTC

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